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Jan 31
2014

Oldest Books in Our Library Followup

Posted by: heather

I got an interesting response today from Sean Lanksbury (and forwarded by Jeff Martin) at our very own Washington State Library regarding that "Oldest Books in the Library" post I made back on January 10th. Sean writes:

History of Washington, The Evergreen State, from Early Dawn to Daylight is done in a grandiose and heroic style very common to late 19th century histories.  The Editor, Julian Hawthorne (1846 - 1934) was the only son of novelist Nathaniel Hawthorne and painter Sophia Peabody.  The work was the editor’s second work of Historical Non-Fiction, following The Story of Oregon: A History With Portraits and Biographies, (New York, NY: American Historical Publishing, 1892.)  Hawthorne was also known as a writer of gothically-styled Romantic Era novels, which were commercially successful but critically disdained for not following in his father’s footsteps.  His non-fiction editing fared better in critical circles.

Colonel George Douglas Brewerton was a poet, sketch artist and painter who during his military service was part of Kit Carson's 1848 expedition from Los Angeles, California to New Mexico. He gained some notoriety for publishing a three-part work on the trip in Harper's Weekly.   Brewerton came to Tacoma in the mid to late 1880s. WSL has a copy of a poem he wrote and recited memorializing the Grand Army of the Republic and fallen soldiers to a Tacoma crowd on Decoration Day (c/k/a Memorial Day) in 1889: 

http://stlow.iii.com/search~S1?/o69957550

Sources:

"George Douglas Brewerton: Painter, Historian, and Poet of the Far West," by Lewis O. Saum. The Pacific Northwest Quarterly, Vol. 94, No. 1 (Winter, 2002/2003), pp. 3-13)

"Julian Hawthorne." Contemporary Authors Online. Detroit: Gale, 2003. Literature Resource Center. Web. 31 Jan. 2014. 

Cheers,

Sean Lanksbury

So now we know more about these lovely old books in our collection. :-)

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